Friday 5! Volumes of lead sheets and those crazy Sinatra chords

By May 25, 2017 Friday Five

Hello there 🙂

Welcome to a new and a bit more in-depth Friday 5! Last week, we asked you to write in some of the things you have been struggling with as a music therapist (or music therapist in-training). This week we dedicate the Friday 5 to your specific requests.

Just a note: Since we got a lot of responses, you may not see a resource here that matches your question. If that’s the case, rest assured that we are still working on finding good, pertinent resources/ideas, and will get those to you. If you’d like to help out some fellow music therapists, stay tuned till the end of this post to share your own ideas for these situations.

SONG
Resource #1:
When You’re Smiling, made famous by Louis Armstrong

ISSUE: Digitizing volumes of lead sheets and organizing them
Resource #2:
The “Brute Force” Guide
We recommended you use this method (taking pictures of the lead sheets with your iPad) with a program like OnSong.

Resource #3:
Ultimate Guitar App
Consider Ultimate Guitar’s app where you can look up songs. Unfortunately, that does mean that some of the songs will not have the same chord progression you are used to and none of your personal notes. But on the other hand it could save you a bunch of time.

ISSUE: Playing those crazy Sinatra chords
Resource #4:
Guitar Club
Members have access to a pretty extensive library of guitar how-tos, and new videos are added based on what you want to learn.

ISSUE: Revisiting hospice work
Resource #5: Hospice and Palliative Care by Russell Hilliard
For hospice, definitely check out Russell Hilliard’s work if you haven’t already. You can also check out this blog post for some general ideas.

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We are so happy to say that lots of people wrote us with some good dilemmas! We weren’t able to get to all of them, but we do know that YOU are a wealth of information as well. Without getting into too much detail, we’d love to hear from you about any resources YOU have about:

  • Doing sessions when you have lost your voice. (Specifically with populations with developmental disabilities.)
  • How to start and maintain a music therapy supervision group.
  • How you deal with being isolated as a music therapist.
  • How to approach live music that is not easily replicable on the guitar.

Share your knowledge in the comments. Thanks for being a community member at Music Therapy Source!

Helping each other out – that’s what it’s all about.

Have a great extended weekend 🙂
-Hannah and Matt

 

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